torontocrow:

Andy Warhol and Alfred Hitchcock

torontocrow:

Andy Warhol and Alfred Hitchcock

(via torontocrow-deactivated20140330)


dontgifadamn:

Yoko Ono, Andy Warhol & John Lennon

Yoko + Andy + John

dontgifadamn:

Yoko Ono, Andy Warhol & John Lennon

Yoko + Andy + John


Blast Off

Blast Off


I learned there are troubles of more than one kind. Some come from ahead, others come from behind. But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready, you see. Now my troubles are going to have trouble with me.
Dr. Suess

Bug in my cup

Bug in my cup


Faced

Faced


supafly

supafly


Roasted Brussels Sprouts
🔻Brussels sprouts
🔻Tablespoon Olive Oil
🔻Salt & Pepper
Begin by dividing Brussels sprouts in half, lengthwise. Place all ingredients in a bowl and toss to combine. Face down, align coated Brussels sprouts on cooking sheet and put in preheated 475 degree oven for 20-30 minutes. Serve with your favorite mustard or vinegar based sauce.


unexplainedthings:

earth vs the flying saucers

(via scienceetfiction)


cozydark:

Mercury May Have Harbored an Ancient Magma Ocean |
By analyzing Mercury’s rocky surface, scientists have been able to partially reconstruct the planet’s history over billions of years. Now, drawing upon the chemical composition of rock features on the planet’s surface, scientists at MIT have proposed that Mercury may have harbored a large, roiling ocean of magma very early in its history, shortly after its formation about 4.5 billion years ago.
The scientists analyzed data gathered by MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging), a NASA probe that has orbited the planet since March 2011. Later that year, a group of scientists analyzed X-ray fluorescence data from the probe, and identified two distinct compositions of rocks on the planet’s surface. The discovery unearthed a planetary puzzle: What geological processes could have given rise to such distinct surface compositions?
To answer that question, the MIT team used the compositional data to recreate the two rock types in the lab, and subjected each synthetic rock to high temperatures and pressures to simulate various geological processes. From their experiments, the scientists came up with only one phenomenon to explain the two compositions: a vast magma ocean that created two different layers of crystals, solidified, then eventually remelted into magma that then erupted onto Mercury’s surface.
“The thing that’s really amazing on Mercury is, this didn’t happen yesterday,” says Timothy Grove, a professor of geology at MIT. “The crust is probably more than 4 billion years old, so this magma ocean is a really ancient feature.” 

cozydark:

Mercury May Have Harbored an Ancient Magma Ocean |

By analyzing Mercury’s rocky surface, scientists have been able to partially reconstruct the planet’s history over billions of years. Now, drawing upon the chemical composition of rock features on the planet’s surface, scientists at MIT have proposed that Mercury may have harbored a large, roiling ocean of magma very early in its history, shortly after its formation about 4.5 billion years ago.

The scientists analyzed data gathered by MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging), a NASA probe that has orbited the planet since March 2011. Later that year, a group of scientists analyzed X-ray fluorescence data from the probe, and identified two distinct compositions of rocks on the planet’s surface. The discovery unearthed a planetary puzzle: What geological processes could have given rise to such distinct surface compositions?

To answer that question, the MIT team used the compositional data to recreate the two rock types in the lab, and subjected each synthetic rock to high temperatures and pressures to simulate various geological processes. From their experiments, the scientists came up with only one phenomenon to explain the two compositions: a vast magma ocean that created two different layers of crystals, solidified, then eventually remelted into magma that then erupted onto Mercury’s surface.

“The thing that’s really amazing on Mercury is, this didn’t happen yesterday,” says Timothy Grove, a professor of geology at MIT. “The crust is probably more than 4 billion years old, so this magma ocean is a really ancient feature.”